A Travellerspoint blog

Culture and history and pandas

And reallylongwordswithoutanyspaces

sunny

I had a bit of a lie in the next morning, a bit weary from a couple of long days, but I eventually got moving and got the S-bahn into town.

My camera charger was one of the things in the missing bag, and the battery was now starting to run down, so the first thing I did was go to a camera shop and attempt to buy a new charging machine. They didn’t have the specific type, but tried to sell me an all-in-one type of thing for a ridiculous amount, which I later found out wouldn’t even have worked.

I walked up Tauentzienstraβe, as one does, and unfortunately found the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedächtniskirche closed. The famous zoo next door, which includes such international celebrities as Bao Bao the panda, didn’t really tickle my fancy when there’s so much else to do, but I did have a look at the Tiergarten, a huge park right in the city centre.

The Tiergarten

The Tiergarten

A stroll through the delightful tree-lined paths took me to the musical instrument museum (de Musikinstrumenten-Museum Berlin), where Tom works as a conservationist. It was really good – there were grand pianos from the 15th Century decorated with grand scenes of nature on the inside of the lid, quarter-size violins that were used by dancing teachers to catch the attention of their students, a gigantic organ, and some weird and wacky horn instruments. If I was any good at music I’m sure I could have appreciated it even more.

The musical instrument museum

The musical instrument museum

I wandered through the Kulturforum and had a look at the giant gold building, the Philharmonie, and the various galleries. I stopped at Potsdamer Platz, another of Berlin’s big squares, and one that retains a small section of the wall that once ran through it.

The Philharmonie

The Philharmonie

The Berlin Wall

The Berlin Wall

I walked back up once again to the Brandenburger Tor, stopping at the Holocaust Denkmal (memorial), a huge field of concrete blocks symbolising the murdered. I’m not quite sure what the significance was, but there you go. The museum/information centre underneath the ground level was very impressive and very moving, telling the stories of individuals as well as emphasising the size of the destruction.

The Holocaust Denkmal (memorial)

The Holocaust Denkmal (memorial)

Near the exit was a computer connected to a database of those killed in the Holocaust. Out of curiosity, I searched ‘Liebhold’, and to my slight surprise found eight or ten Liebholds from Mannheim listed. I’m not sure whether they were relatives, but there’s a reasonable chance. Plus, their names were submitted by sons and daughters from the US, France and Israel, meaning we might have some unknown distant, living, relatives scattered around.

I stopped at the incredible German Parliament building, the Reichstag, for a quick photo, before taking another look at the Brandenburger Tor and taking the S-bahn home.

The Reichstag

The Reichstag

Tom had prepared a traditional and delicious German dish, a bit like gnocchi, and I got home just in time to have some as we discussed his museum.

Posted by sammyhez 02:58 Archived in Germany Tagged berlin

Table of contents

Be the first to comment on this entry.

Comments on this blog entry are now closed to non-Travellerspoint members. You can still leave a comment if you are a member of Travellerspoint.

Enter your Travellerspoint login details below

( What's this? )

If you aren't a member of Travellerspoint yet, you can join for free.

Join Travellerspoint